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Mark Shrime

Director of Harvard's Center for Global Surgery Evaluation, visiting scholar at Princeton University & American Ninja Warrior.
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Mark Shrime: Speech Topics


① SOLVING FOR WHY | ② THE GLOBAL SURGERY CRISIS | ③ KEEP YOUR HEART

① Solving for Why


Lessons from the field on life, work, and the transformative power of purpose. How does a person who never wanted to be a doctor find purpose in the halls of medicine? Drawn from, and anchored with, my own stories of growing from a reluctant medical student to a man working as a surgeon on a hospital ship in West Africa, this talk distills the lessons I've learned and seeks to apply them to anyone looking for purpose in their lives.

② The Global Surgery Crisis


30% of the world's diseases require surgery, but 5 billion people around the world can't get surgery when they need it. Every year, 81 million people—four times the entire population of Australia—are driven into when they try to get surgery. This talk covers not just the crisis but the work that I and my colleagues are doing to combat it.

③ Keep Your Heart


Where your feet go, there your heart is. In this talk, I discuss four foundational truths about creating and keeping a life of purpose, meaning, and deep contentment.

Mark Shrime: Books


Solving for Why: Lessons on Life, Work and the Transformative Power of Purpose FORTHCOMING, 2020 … ➡︎

Mark Shrime: Bio


      Mark G. Shrime, MD, MPH, PhD, FACS, is the founder and Director of the Center for Global Surgery Evaluation at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, an Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology and of Global Health and Social Medicine at the Harvard Medical School, and a Visiting Research Scholar at Princeton University’s Center for Health and Wellbeing.

He is the author of seminal papers on the global burden of surgical disease, the financial burden facing surgical patients, and the number of people who cannot access safe surgery worldwide. He served as a co-author on the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery.

Dr. Shrime graduated summa cum laude from Princeton University in 1996 with a BA in molecular biology. He received his MD from the University of Texas in 2001, after taking a year to teach organic chemistry in Singapore. Medical school was followed by a residency in otolaryngology at the joint Columbia/Cornell program in Manhattan, followed, in turn, by a fellowship in head and neck surgical oncology at the University of Toronto in 2007. He completed a second fellowship in microvascular reconstructive surgery, also at the University of Toronto, in 2008. He was the first to identify a novel independent prognostic indicator in head and neck cancer.

To date, he has worked and taught in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, Benin, Togo, Congo, Haiti, Saudi Arabia, Cameroon, and Madagascar. In May, 2011, he graduated with an MPH in global health from the Harvard School of Public Health, where he was a finalist for both the Albert Schweitzer award and the HSPH Student Recognition award, and in May, 2015, he received his PhD in health policy from Harvard University, with a concentration in decision science.

His research is supported by the Damon Runyon Cancer Foundation and by an anonymous donation to the Center for Global Surgery Evaluation; he has previously received research support from the GE Foundation’s Safe Surgery 2020 project and the Steven C. and Carmella Kletjian Foundation. He is currently the Principal Investigator on a randomized controlled trial of financial incentives for surgical patients in Guinea and the Principal Investigator on a prospective extended cost-effectiveness analysis of maxillofacial surgery in West Africa.

His academic pursuits focus on surgical delivery in low- and middle-income countries, where he has a specific interest in the intersection of health and impoverishment. His work aims to determine optimal policies and platforms for surgical delivery that maximize health benefits while simultaneously minimizing the risk of financial catastrophe faced by patients. In 2018, he was awarded the Arnold P. Gold Humanism in Medicine Award by the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery.

When not working, he is an avid photographer and rock climber, and has competed on Seasons 8, 9, and 11 of American Ninja Warrior.

✉ Request Booking Info for Mark Shrime



MARK SHRIME

Director of Harvard's Center for Global Surgery Evaluation, visiting scholar at Princeton University & American Ninja Warrior.
SPEECH TOPICS

① Solving for Why
Lessons from the field on life, work, and the transformative power of purpose. How does a person who never wanted to be a doctor find purpose in the halls of medicine? Drawn from, and anchored with, my own stories of growing from a reluctant medical student to a man working as a surgeon on a hospital ship in West Africa, this talk distills the lessons I've learned and seeks to apply them to anyone looking for purpose in their lives.
② The Global Surgery Crisis
30% of the world's diseases require surgery, but 5 billion people around the world can't get surgery when they need it. Every year, 81 million people—four times the entire population of Australia—are driven into when they try to get surgery. This talk covers not just the crisis but the work that I and my colleagues are doing to combat it.
③ Keep Your Heart
Where your feet go, there your heart is. In this talk, I discuss four foundational truths about creating and keeping a life of purpose, meaning, and deep contentment.
BOOKS


BIO

[PRESS KIT] Mark G. Shrime, MD, MPH, PhD, FACS, is the founder and Director of the Center for Global Surgery Evaluation at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, an Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology and of Global Health and Social Medicine at the Harvard Medical School, and a Visiting Research Scholar at Princeton University’s Center for Health and Wellbeing.

He is the author of seminal papers on the global burden of surgical disease, the financial burden facing surgical patients, and the number of people who cannot access safe surgery worldwide. He served as a co-author on the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery.

Dr. Shrime graduated summa cum laude from Princeton University in 1996 with a BA in molecular biology. He received his MD from the University of Texas in 2001, after taking a year to teach organic chemistry in Singapore. Medical school was followed by a residency in otolaryngology at the joint Columbia/Cornell program in Manhattan, followed, in turn, by a fellowship in head and neck surgical oncology at the University of Toronto in 2007. He completed a second fellowship in microvascular reconstructive surgery, also at the University of Toronto, in 2008. He was the first to identify a novel independent prognostic indicator in head and neck cancer.

To date, he has worked and taught in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, Benin, Togo, Congo, Haiti, Saudi Arabia, Cameroon, and Madagascar. In May, 2011, he graduated with an MPH in global health from the Harvard School of Public Health, where he was a finalist for both the Albert Schweitzer award and the HSPH Student Recognition award, and in May, 2015, he received his PhD in health policy from Harvard University, with a concentration in decision science.

His research is supported by the Damon Runyon Cancer Foundation and by an anonymous donation to the Center for Global Surgery Evaluation; he has previously received research support from the GE Foundation’s Safe Surgery 2020 project and the Steven C. and Carmella Kletjian Foundation. He is currently the Principal Investigator on a randomized controlled trial of financial incentives for surgical patients in Guinea and the Principal Investigator on a prospective extended cost-effectiveness analysis of maxillofacial surgery in West Africa.

His academic pursuits focus on surgical delivery in low- and middle-income countries, where he has a specific interest in the intersection of health and impoverishment. His work aims to determine optimal policies and platforms for surgical delivery that maximize health benefits while simultaneously minimizing the risk of financial catastrophe faced by patients. In 2018, he was awarded the Arnold P. Gold Humanism in Medicine Award by the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery.

When not working, he is an avid photographer and rock climber, and has competed on Seasons 8, 9, and 11 of American Ninja Warrior. ✉ REQUEST BOOKING INFO